July 2015

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1728436 Ontario Inc

July 2015

 

Volume 12, Number 07

How Metabolism Modulates Inflammation

By Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo
Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo

The term inflammation has a distinct shortage of positive connotations, sort of like terrorism and pollution. However, unlike these last two problems, inflammation enjoys a much more subtle relationship with our physiology. Driving a car is a good analogy: One can drive a car leisurely and restfully on a tree-lined parkway just as likely as drive off a cliff or into a chicken coop. The difference between the two is largely a matter of direction and velocity. Surprisingly, many of the same cellular functions that give rise to inflammation and autoimmune problems serve in their day-to-day capacities as essential processes that maintain health.

Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo

Many of the genetic elements that give rise to inflammation exist in a teeter-totter type relationship that is part of the bigger picture, a regulatory process known as homeostasis. A gene gets active and makes its protein; the protein exerts its effects, and these effects trigger other genes that make proteins with opposing functions, or proteins that turn the first gene off. As with our driving analogy, the difference between a safe driver and a reckless one is the ability to adjust the gas pedal and steering to the demands of the environment. In the case of the car, it is the path of the road; in the case of the cell, it is the changes in its internal and external environment.

For example, a gene called TNF (tumor necrosis factor) ramps up a lot of inflammation. However TNF, also triggers many of the immune hormones (the interleukins) that also protect the cell from infection. Under certain conditions, TNF will stimulate these interleukins excessively or unnecessarily. Then inflammation will develop. Being overweight is one way for this to occur: overweight people often manufacture too much of a hormone called leptin. Leptin can trigger TNF and increase inflammation -- except when we exercise. The small level of inflammation produced during exercise actually blocks the further production of TNF.

Thankfully, leptin has its nemesis, in this case a protein called adiponectin. Adiponectin pretty much does all the right things: It blocks leptin and prevents TNF from binding to proinflammatory proteins known as COX (COX proteins are what many anti-inflammatory drugs and herbs target). Adiponectin also activates fat-busting genes known as PPARs, which you may remember I discussed in a previous newsletter. PPARs turn on many genes involved in the metabolism of lipids and sugar.

When TNF builds up, it activates another gene called NFKB1, and now here comes trouble. NFKB1 is like the big brother of a ten-year old in a schoolyard squabble who is called and proceeds to turn a minor dispute into a full-fledged battle royal. When NFKB1 gets angry, everybody gets upset: it is capable of turning on over 300 other proinflammatory genes! Having a brawny 21-year old big brother is great when you are walking in a dangerous neighborhood or need to move the sofa, but it pays to keep him happy otherwise. Having many free radicals in your cell is guaranteed to put NFKB1 in a bad mood.

So, what can we do to keep inflammation in balance --doing just enough to help with the daily housekeeping, but not too much, so the place doesn't get trashed. Here are some ideas:

  • Lectin Avoidance: Dietary lectins are known to increase several of the proinflammatory interleukins. They also can induce an imbalance of flora in the gut (dysbiosis) which can stimulate sensors and activate TNF. Many lectins will actually plunk themselves onto the receptor for leptin and act as if they were leptin itself. Finally, the wrong lectins in your diet can block fat metabolism, and as we have seen, being overweight tends to increase inflammation. Using a lectin blocking formula such as Deflect can speed up the response.
  • Sleep Tight: Many of the proinflammatory genes are 'reset' during sleep. Getting a good night's sleep is essential to controlling inflammation. I'll talk more about this in the next newsletter.
  • Exercise: Exercise actually decreases inflammation, despite the fact that it in and of itself produces a small amount of inflammation as well. I guess Nietzsche was right: what doesn't kill you does in fact make you stronger.
  • Squash Free Radicals: Free radicals are crazy oxygen molecules that like to crash into fats and genes and cause trouble. As we get older, our ability to block free radical drops, at which time an anti-oxidant supplement is advised.
  • Talk to Your Genes: Many natural products are known to modulate the actions of genes that are involved in inflammation.

My good friend, the late philosopher Eric Butterworth, once commented to me that the 'Body has an innate bias towards healing.' When was the last time you ever heard someone turn the word 'bias' into a good thing? How true indeed! Just as in the case of inflammation, meaning requires context. On its own, the cell will strive towards balance. We simply need to help it achieve that.

 

Think Cool Thoughts

By Martha D'Adamo
Martha D'Adamo

With this issue's focus on inflammation, I have had the opportunity to learn more about the inflammatory process, what sets it off, as well as how to develop strategies for managing inflammation, whether it is short term/acute or chronic. "Good inflammation" can be part of the healing process, as the body's natural defenses rally around it to help heal from a cut or wound; "bad inflammation" creates damage and causes longer-term issues such as heart disease, arthritis, and depression.

Eating well, following your specific blood type diet and exercising are critical components in inflammation management. And research is now revealing that there's another element that we can incorporate into the mix to assist us in lowering the inflammatory conditions that arise in life – meditation. Say, what? There's a developing body of research that shows that meditation can suppress genes that cause inflammation. Researchers are finding that individuals can alter genetic behavior through thought control and meditation. The combination of nutrition, lifestyle and mindfulness can be a powerful tripod of tools that can support us throughout every stage of our lives.

Having meditated for years, I see the value of it in my life on a daily basis. Initially, I thought that it would be good for stress reduction and blood pressure control – and it was. It also provides the opportunity to step outside of the day-to-day issues of life, even for five minutes, and then return. Refreshed, removed, and able to see life without encumbrances.

Many times, when I talk to people about meditation, they get kind of squirmy. "I don't have time," "I can't sit still," or simply, "I don't know how to do it." There's no magic or mystery to it, and you don't need five hours. One of my teachers used to say, "Five minutes on the clock can provide everything you need," and it does. It also promotes a practice that you want to build on. Five minutes becomes 10 or 20. 

Here's a wonderful meditation to practice, whether you are a beginner or a more advanced meditator:

Sit comfortably, feet on the ground, spine straight, hands on your knees. Take a deep breath in, inhaling deeply from the abdomen, up through the solar plexus, into the upper chest. Hold the breath for three counts, and then slowly exhale, gently releasing the breath as it empties from the upper chest, the solar plexus and the abdomen. Repeat this breathing for three or five cycles, maintaining your awareness on your breath. If your mind wanders, note it, and bring your awareness back to your breath.

As you breathe, imagine you are at the opening of a forest. It is cool, with filtered sunlight shining through the trees. As you enter the forest, you walk along a path that takes you to a stream. You sit by the stream, and immerse your hand in the cool, crisp water. Allow the water to wash over your hand, and as it does, it draws out the heat from your body. Stay by the stream until you feel ready to leave. As you return to the opening of the forest, take a moment and express your gratitude for the cooling embrace of the forest and the stream, knowing that you can return here time and time again.

I love this meditation, as it is simple and yet very meaningful. As with any meditation, you can adjust it so that it suits you, as the very practice of meditation is to take you to your center or source.

Another helpful tool, although not quite a meditation is alternate nostril breathing (nadi shodhana in Sanskrit). This is a fantastic practice as breathing is the foundation of any meditative practice. Here's how to practice:

Sit comfortably. With your right hand, place your index and third fingers on your forehead. Take your thumb and close your right nostril. Breathe in deeply through the left nostril, then take your ring finger and close your left nostril and breathe out through your right nostril. Breathe in through the right nostril, place the thumb on it to close it, and then breathe out through the left. Repeat this process 10-20 times. The result is grounding and energizing!

The key to anything in life, whether it is mastery of a new skill, meeting a challenge, or learning something new, is practice, practice, practice. If you stop and think about it, isn't this what life is all about? Whatever it is you practice, enjoy it, and allow it to nourish and enrich you and keep you vital and healthy. 

Be cool.

Martha

 

Product Highlight: Unibars

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Our Unibars are the perfect grab and go, blood type friendly snack, whether you are hiking, relaxing, heading to the beach, or need a mid-morning or afternoon snack at the office. In two delicious flavors: Chocolate Cherry [Martha's favorite] or Blueberry Almond [Dr. D's favorite]. Take your pick... or one of each.

For the month of July, enjoy 10% OFF*.

*Enjoy now through July 31, 2015. Offers not to be combined with other discounts.

 

Blood Type Diet in the News

Here's a round up of articles about the blood type that have appeared in recent news reports. These reinforce the value of personalized nutrition and the BTD in health and wellness and also in developing health strategies for specific diseases. Science is catching up to Dr. Peter D'Adamo!
Tech Times You're OK With Type O Blood, It Might Protect You From Alzheimer's
Medical Daily Blood Type And Brain Health: Type O Protects Against Cognitive Decline Via Gray Matter
Live Science Your Blood Type May Put You at Risk for Heart Disease
The Globe Inside Out: Does the Blood Type Diet work?
Prevention Magazine 5 Things Your Blood Type Says About Your Health

 

LOCAL EVENT:
Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo to speak on July 24th in Connecticut

Orchids of Life benefit/fundraiser

Here's a great opportunity to hear Dr. D'Adamo speak and support a worthy cause. On Friday, July 24, Dr. D'Adamo will be the guest speaker at the Orchids of Life benefit/fundraiser to support non-toxic cancer research.

You can find out all the details at the Orchids of Life website.

Hope to see you there!

 

Summer Soufflés

Summer brunches are a great time to share a wonderful meal made with veggies from the local farmers market or if possible, your own garden. Here is a selection of four delicious and beautiful soufflés we love that can be the centerpiece of your meal. Serve with mixed greens, a fruit salad, and muffins and rolls that are right for each type.

Spinach and Zucchini Soufflé – Type O

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon ghee
  • 2 tablespoons of brown rice flour
  • ½ cup almond milk or rice milk
  • ½ cup vegetable stock
  • 2 cups packed spinach
  • 2 cups chopped zucchini
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • ¼ cup chopped basil
  • ¼ cup crumbled feta cheese (NS omit cheese)
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 4 large egg whites at room temperature
Directions:
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 4 (12 oz) ramekins with nonstick cooking spray and set aside.
  2. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt ghee and whisk in flour. Gradually add almond (or rice) milk and stock, whisking continuously until thickened, about 3 to 4 minutes. Once mixture is thick and resembles the consistency of yogurt, remove from the heat and cool completely.
  3. In a food processor, puree spinach and zucchini; strain excess liquid through cheesecloth or paper towels. Place vegetables in a bowl and whisk in egg yolks, basil, cheese, and cloves. Set aside.
  4. Once cooled, fold milk mixture into vegetable mixture.
  5. In a dry, glass bowl, beat egg whites with a hand mixer until they form stiff peaks. Fold the egg whites, one-third at a time, into the vegetables. Spoon mixture into prepared ramekins, and set on a baking dish. Fill baking dish halfway with hot water. Carefully place in the oven and bake for 45 minutes or until tester comes out clean.
  6. Serve immediately.

Spinach and Zucchini Soufflé – Type A

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon ghee
  • 2 tablespoons of oat flour
  • ½ cup soy or almond milk
  • ½ cup vegetable stock
  • 2 cups packed spinach
  • 2 cups chopped zucchini
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • ¼ cup chopped basil
  • ¼ cup crumbled feta cheese
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 4 large egg whites at room temperature

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 4 (12 oz) ramekins with nonstick cooking spray and set aside.
  2. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt ghee and whisk in flour. Gradually add soy milk (or almond milk) and stock, whisking continuously until thickened, about 3 to 4 minutes. Once mixture is thick and resembles the consistency of yogurt, remove from the heat and cool completely.
  3. In a food processor, puree spinach and zucchini; strain excess liquid through cheesecloth or paper towels. Place vegetables in a bowl and whisk in egg yolks, basil, cheese, and cloves. Set aside.
  4. Once cooled, fold milk mixture into vegetable mixture.
  5. In a dry, glass bowl, beat egg whites with a hand mixer until they form stiff peaks. Fold the egg whites, one-third at a time, into the vegetables. Spoon mixture into prepared ramekins, and set on a baking dish. Fill baking dish halfway with hot water. Carefully place in the oven and bake for 45 minutes or until tester comes out clean.
  6. Serve immediately.

Spinach-Pepper Soufflé – Type B

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon ghee
  • 2 tablespoons spelt or oat flour
  • ½ cup 2% cow's milk
  • ½ cup vegetable stock
  • 2 cups packed spinach
  • 1 cup chopped bell pepper
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • ¼ cup chopped basil
  • ¼ cup grated Gruyère cheese
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Sea salt, to taste
  • 4 large egg whites at room temperature
Directions:
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 4 (12 oz) ramekins with non-stick cooking spray, place in a baking dish, and set aside.
  2. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt ghee and whisk in flour. Gradually add milk and stock, whisking continuously until thickened, about 3 to 4 minutes. Once mixture is thick and resembles the consistency of yogurt, remove from the heat and let cool completely.
  3. In a food processor, puree spinach and bell pepper. Place pureed vegetables onto a cheesecloth or paper towels, wrap the cloth around the vegetables, and strain excess liquid by gently squeezing the vegetable juice through the cloth. Place vegetables in a bowl, and whisk in egg yolks, basil, cheese, cayenne, and salt.
  4. Fold milk mixture into vegetable mixture and set aside.
  5. In a dry, glass bowl, beat egg whites with a hand mixer until they form stiff peaks. Fold the egg whites, one-third at a time, into the vegetables. Spoon mixture into prepared ramekins, and fill the baking dish halfway with hot water. Carefully place in the oven and back for 45 minutes or until tester inserted into ramekin comes out clean.
  6. Serve immediately.

Kale and Zucchini Soufflé – Type AB

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon ghee
  • 2 tablespoons brown rice or spelt flour
  • ½ cup 2% cow's or goat's milk
  • ½ cup vegetable stock
  • 2 cups packed chopped kale
  • 2 cups chopped zucchini
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • ¼ cup basil
  • ¼ cup grated Gruyère cheese
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground cloves
  • 4 large egg whites at room temperature

Directions:

  1. Prehat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 4 (12 oz) ramekins with non-stick cooking spray and set aside.
  2. In a medium saucepan, melt ghee over medium heat, and whisk in flour. Gradually add milk and stock, whisking continuously until thickened, about 3 to 4 minutes. Once mixture is thick and resembles the consistency of yogurt, remove from the heat and cool completely.
  3. Grate kale and zucchini in a food processor, and strain excess liquid through cheesecloth or paper towel. Place vegetables in a bowl, and whisk in egg yolks, basil, cheese, and cloves. Fold milk mixture into pureed vegetables and set aside.
  4. In a dry, glass bowl, beat egg whites with a hand mixer until they form stiff peaks. Fold egg whites, one-third at a time, into the vegetables. Divide mixture evenly among prepared ramekins. Set ramekins on a baking dish and place on the middle rack in oven, fill the baking dish halfway with hot water. Bake for 45 minutes or until tester comes out clean.
  5. Serve immediately.

Find more delicious side dishes and recipes as well as healthy cooking tips in the Eat Right for Your Type Personalized Cookbooks